Category Archives: walking

5 minutes and 4 crossing to cross the main road outside Royal Infirmary Edinburgh

Last month I was up in Edinburgh visiting family. Whilst on a wander I came across a crazy long crossing over the main road outside the Royal Infirmary Edinburgh. The 4 crossings took just under 5 minutes to cross with a button press at each crossing.

I used the most direct crossing possible, following the pedestrian crossings, to be able to get across the main road from the walking and cycling route that runs past the hospital from the walking routes from the back of the hospital and Greendykes, to the Moredun/Craigour side of Old Dalkeith Road.

Anotated map showing the crossings
Annotated map of the crossings. (Google Satellite view).

I’ve recorded a video walking across this road (just the crossings):

Video of the slow pedestrian crossing.

Is 5 minutes too long to cross a main road? I think it is. Is it any wonder why pedestrians walk across roads without waiting for a green man when it take so long? Edinburgh is investing in active travel, though I’m sure reducing the time it takes for pedestrians to cross main roads would be a cheap and cost effective way to improve pedestrian safety and make walking and cycling more desirable. Maybe more people would walk places if the waiting time wasn’t as long?

Maybe it’s time car drivers had to wind down the window and press a button several times to get through junctions like this?

For the eagle eyed, after completing the crossing I reported the red men on the crossings as not working via the Clarence hotline.

The dilemma of highway rules vs friendly drivers

Fiona on Infento trike.

I’m currently teaching my 1½ year old daughter how to cross the road on various trips out, including the 5 minute walk along the road to or from our childminder.

She is very good at staying on the pavement, and when it come to crossing the road will wait and look for vehicles that are coming. Then when there is a gap we will cross together. She’s very good at following the verbal instructions. Of course I don’t let her do it on her own yet, though it’s important when time permits to talk through all of the steps involved.

The highway code rule 7 is the Green Cross Code. In summary the steps are:

  1. Find a safe place to cross
  2. Stop just before you get to the kerb
  3. Look all around for traffic and listen
  4. If traffic is coming, let it pass
  5. When it is safe, go straight across the road – do not run

The dilemma comes when friendly drivers are being nice waiting and waving us across the road. However I’ve come across several occasions over the years where drivers have done that, without realising that there is another vehicle coming where the driver won’t give way. This can be exceptionally dangerous.

The Green Cross Code does not mention anything about drivers waving you across the road, likely due to the above complexity of having to be extra careful about other drivers who haven’t seen you.

It would be much quicker for all concerned if we followed the priorities set out in the highway code, as I will just wave people on to wait for a gap in the traffic. The gaps appear fairly frequently, especially on quieter residential roads. It’s common for a dozen vehicles to appear at the same time, and then there to be a big gap when there are no vehicles coming.

 

I’ve had a similar situation recently when cycling home at a set of traffic signals when the driver in front of myself and another cyclist decided to slow down and wave across another oncoming driver. The oncoming driver was waving to point out that we were cycling close behind. The small uphill just after the traffic lights means that cyclists try to keep up momentum to get up the small hill easier, and avoiding stopping at the bottom of the hill at the traffic lights.